News & Opinion

2022
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998
1997
1996
1967
1966


• St Chad ‘returns’ to Lichfield Cathedral (7 Nov 2022)

• Pope Francis prays for unity of church as he celebrates anniversary of Vatican II (11 Oct 2022)

• Irish Benedictine to lead Vatican’s relations with Anglicans and Methodists (7 Oct 2022)

• ‘Ecumenical winter’ must end, declares Archbishop Welby (8 Sep 2022)

• Archbishop of Canterbury: “In this time of world crisis, Christians are to be a community of peace” (7 Sep 2022)

July ~ 2017 ~ Anglican-Roman Catholic news & opinion

Catholics, Anglicans complete work on church authority, communion
11 July 2017 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=4142
Pope Francis greets Anglican Archbishop Bernard Ntahoturi, director of the Anglican Centre in Rome and the archbishop of Canterbury's personal representative to the Holy See, during his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican

The Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission published its first document in 13 years on how both institutions can learn from each other in the exercise of ecclesial authority locally, regionally and globally.

The document, “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church — Local, Regional, Universal,” is the first to come out of the third phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, known as ARCIC III, which began meeting in 2011. The Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity made the document public on its website July 2.

The latest agreed statement on how structures of authority support and promote ecclesial communion is considered a key element in understanding how discussion and debates are handled and decisions about ethics and “right” moral teachings are made, which will be the topic of the next document by ARCIC III.

The statement also represents a new methodology of “receptive ecumenical learning,” which, it says, seeks “to learn how the experience and structures of the other tradition might help them address their own questions and difficulties.”

The document explores the respective structures of the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion and identifies the challenges and difficulties each tradition faces at the local, regional and worldwide levels. It then asks what each tradition holds that might be transformative or beneficial and learned from the other tradition so as to better support the mission of the church.

“This task requires frank assessment, repentance, and the courage to look at ourselves honestly and learn from the other,” the agreed statement said.