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• Dalle differenze s’impara. Documento della commissione internazionale anglicano-cattolica (5 Jul 2018)

• Groundbreaking document released on how Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn from each other (4 Jul 2018)

• ARCIC III: Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn much from each other, says new agreed statement (4 Jul 2018)

• ARCIC document hailed as ‘groundbreaking’ by Catholics and Anglicans (4 Jul 2018)

• Agreed statement on ecclesiology: Walking Together on the Way (3 Jul 2018)

2018 ~ Anglican-Roman Catholic news & opinion

Dalle differenze s’impara. Documento della commissione internazionale anglicano-cattolica
5 July 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2947

Welcoming Christ, a sculpture above the main north door of Liverpool Cathedral. Credit: Wikimedia CommonsLa differenza non è più motivo di sospetto o di rimprovero, ma è soprattutto un’opportunità arricchente per l’ascolto reciproco, l’apprendimento e la conversione. È questo lo spirito innovativo che sottende il nuovo documento adottato dalla Commissione internazionale anglicana-cattolica. Si tratta della prima dichiarazione concordata della terza fase di dialogo ufficiale, nota anche come Arcic III.

Il documento, intitolato Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal (Camminare insieme sulla strada: imparare a essere la Chiesa – locale, regionale, universale) è stato concordato nel corso di una riunione svoltasi a Erfurt, in Germania, nel 2017, ma è stato diffuso il 2 luglio scorso dopo sette anni di riunioni e consultazioni congiunte.

Groundbreaking document released on how Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn from each other
4 July 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2939

Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission met in the central German city of Erfurt in May 2017 for their seventh meeting. During their meeting they completed the agreed statement on ecclesiology. Photo: ARCICAn agreed statement produced by the official commission for dialogue between the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches has been heralded as “ground-breaking” and an “important step on the pilgrimage towards fuller unity in Christ”.

The text for the work – “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal” – was agreed at a meeting of the third phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC III) in the German city of Erfurt in May 2017. It was the first document produced by ARCIC III and is the culmination of seven years’ work.

ARCIC III: Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn much from each other, says new agreed statement
4 July 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2950

The choir of Hereford Cathedral was invited to join the choir of the Sistine Chapel on the steps of St Peter's, Rome, to sing for the two-hour St Peter's mass on last Friday. The Dean of Hereford Cathedral, the Very Revd Michael Tavinor said: After nearly seven years of deliberation, the third Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC III) has issued a statement on authority, structure, and decision-making, which sets out how the two traditions might learn from each other.

The 34,000-word statement Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be the Church — local, regional, universal, which runs to 70 pages, was published on Monday on the website of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity.

The text was agreed in Erfurt, Germany, the scene of Martin Luther’s early ministry, on the 500th anniversary of the start of the Reformation on the Continent.

ARCIC members have described the agreed statement as “exciting”, and suggest that it has the potential to restore ecumenical dialogue to good health after the difficulties experienced since Anglican developments such as the ordination of women and openly gay clergy, and the blessings of same-sex unions.

ARCIC document hailed as ‘groundbreaking’ by Catholics and Anglicans
4 July 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2943

In this 2017 file photo, Pope Francis is flanked by Archbishop David Moxon, then the archbishop of Canterbury's representative to the Vatican, and Cardinal Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, as they arrive for an ecumenical prayer service to conclude the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity at the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls in Rome. Photo: Paul Haring/CNSMembers of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission expressed excitement about a fresh approach to ecumenism outlined in a statement that has taken seven years to produce. Paula Gooder, a British theologian and an Anglican member of the commission, known as ARCIC III, described the statement reflecting on authority and ecclesial communion as “groundbreaking.” “We feel that … we are walking together more closely than ever,” Gooder told Catholic News Service in a July 2 telephone interview. “I think this is a really important document.” She described the commission’s work as entering “new territory” and that she sees “great potential for future conversations and that is really exciting.” Archbishop Bernard Longley of Birmingham, England, Catholic co-chair of ARCIC, said he felt the document was “exciting” because it restored ecumenical dialogue after a hiatus caused by the changes within the Anglican Communion, such as the priestly and episcopal ordination of women.

Agreed statement on ecclesiology: Walking Together on the Way
3 July 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2935

Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission met in the central German city of Erfurt in May 2017 for their seventh meeting. During their meeting they completed the agreed statement on ecclesiology. Photo: ARCICThe Third Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC III) has issued its first agreed statement with the title Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal. Since its first meeting in 1970, ARCIC has published thirteen agreed statements. The third phase of the dialogue began in 2011 with the dual mandate to explore “the Church as Communion, local and universal, and how in communion the local and universal Church come to discern right ethical teaching.” The current document completes the first part of this mandate.

Walking Together on the Way employs the method of Receptive Ecumenism to examine the structures by which Catholics and Anglicans order and maintain communion at the local, regional and universal level. It examines common theological principles that Anglicans and Catholics share, and the differentiated structures, based on these principles, by which they make decisions. This method invites both traditions to repentance and conversion, by looking at what is underdeveloped or wounded in themselves. It is also predicated on the belief that in our dialogue partner we meet a community in which the Holy Spirit is alive and active. We can therefore ask firstly, where our communities are in need of reform, and, secondly, what we can learn from the our dialogue partner to help us in this growth. The Commission described this process as “receptive learning.”

Catholics, Anglicans complete work on structures of authority, communion
3 July 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2945

Pope Francis greets Anglican Archbishop Bernard Ntahoturi, director of the Anglican Center in Rome and the archbishop of Canterbury's personal representative to the Holy See, during his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Nov. 8, 2017. The Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission July 2 published its first document in 13 years on how both institutions can learn from each other in the exercise of ecclesial authority locally, regionally and globally. Credit: Paul Haring/CNSThe Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission published its first document in 13 years on how both institutions can learn from each other in the exercise of ecclesial authority locally, regionally and globally.

The document, “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal,” is the first to come out of the third phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, known as ARCIC III, which began meeting in 2011. The Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity made the document public on its website July 2.

The latest agreed statement on how structures of authority support and promote ecclesial communion is considered a key element in understanding how discussion and debates are handled and decisions about ethics and “right” moral teachings are made, which will be the topic of the next document by ARCIC III.

New ARCIC text charts a way forward
3 July 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2941

Archbishop of Birmingham Bernard Longley, the Catholic co-chair of ARCIC, is pictured here at a service of Vespers. Photo: Mazur/catholicchurch.org.ukWalking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal” is the first document produced by ARCIC in 13 years.

Catholics can learn from Anglicans in giving a greater role to the laity in matters of church governance and more authority to local bishops’ conferences, according to a landmark new document from the official dialogue body of the two Churches.

Anglicans, the text also argues, should focus on setting up structures and processes that safeguard the worldwide identity of its Communion and avoid becoming too focussed on one province.

The recommendations are contained in “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal”, the first document produced by the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) in 13 years.

Humble companions: Catholic-Anglican document sees healing in difference
3 July 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2933

A new document driven by a fresh approach taken by the official Anglican-Roman Catholic dialogue commission reflects a major development in ecumenism where difference is not cause for suspicion or reproach, but is used as an enriching opportunity for mutual listening, learning and conversion.

This notable change is seen in the first agreed statement from the newest and third phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, known as ARCIC III. The statement, “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church — Local, Regional, Universal,” was released to the public July 2 after seven years of joint meetings and consultations.

Catholic-Anglican dialogue document suggests both churches can learn from other
2 July 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2930

The official commission for dialogue between the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches has published its first document in 13 years, focusing on how each global institution can learn from the other in balancing exercise of ecclesial authority at the local, regional and worldwide levels.

Among the considerations in the 68-page report, released July 2, are questions of how the Catholic Church might learn from the Anglican experience to empower local church leaders to act more independently from Rome at times, and to give more governing authority to consultative bodies such as the Synod of Bishops.

“The Roman Catholic Church can learn from the culture of open and frank debate that exists at all levels of the Anglican Communion,” the members of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission state in one of the conclusions of their document, titled: “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church — Local, Regional, Universal.”

Archbishop of Canterbury says a reconciled Church can dispel the “fear of the ‘other’”
6 June 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2927

Archbishop Justin Welby addresses the General Assembly of the Conference of European Churches in Novi Sad, Serbia, on Saturday. Photo: Albin Hillert/CECThe Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has spoken of the danger that “fear of the other” poses to “Christian witness and presence”. Speaking to the General Assembly of the Conference of European Churches, meeting in Novi Sad, Serbia, he said that churches working together can help to break down the walls that others seek to build. “The Church breaks across boundaries and frontiers as if they did not exist,” he said. “By being in Christ, I am made one by God in a family that stretches around the world and crosses cultural, linguistic and ecumenical frontiers, driven by the Spirit who breaks down all the walls that we seek to erect.”

He began his address by saying that “fear is the greatest danger that afflicts Christian witness and presence.” He added: “It is fear of the other that causes us to put up barriers, whether within churches, between churches and for that matter between nations. It is fear of the Other the causes us to build walls, whether spiritual or physical. It is fear of the Other that leads to divisions and eventually to the fall of civilisations.”

Ugandan ecumenical service to honour its martyrs
1 June 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2923

School students perform a play telling the story of the Ugandan Martyrs in Munyonyo earlier this month as part of commemorations leading up to Sunday’s anniversary. Photo: Diocese of NamirembeThousands of Christians from Uganda and neighbouring countries are arriving in Namugongo for special services to commemorate the Ugandan Martyrs. In 3 June 1886, the Kabaka – or King – of Buganda, Mwanga II, killed 32 young Anglicans and Roman Catholic men – who worked as his pages – by burning them alive at Namugongo. They were among 23 Anglicans and 22 Roman Catholics who were put to death by the king for killed by for refusing to recant their faith between 1885 and 1887.

Yesterday, services were held at both the Anglican and Roman Catholic shrines in Namugongo, led by bishops from both Churches. Other similar events will be held in the coming days, leading up to national commemorations on Sunday.

Joint Anglican-Roman Catholic delegation celebrates Malawi ecumenical scholarship
31 May 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2917

Four of the recipients of the St Timothy Scholarship Programme in MalawiA joint Anglican-Roman Catholic delegation visited southern Malawi last week to celebrate the success of an ecumenical scholarship programme started last year by the Anglican Diocese of Upper Shire and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Mangochi. The St Timothy Scholarship Programme was launched in September 2017 as a direct response to the Common Declaration of Pope Francis and Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby at San Gregorio al Celio in Rome on 5 October 2016. The two leaders commissioned and sent out 19 pairs of Anglican and Catholic bishops to work together in collaborative mission and witness to the “ends of the earth” to give voice to their common faith in Jesus Christ. The programme has been warmly endorsed by the International Anglican-Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission (IARCCUM).

The programme, which is funded by offshore donors and managed jointly by the two dioceses, provides scholarships to enable children from the poorest families to attend residential secondary schools run by the dioceses on an all expenses paid basis. The €600 (Euro, approximately £530 GBP) scholarships cover tuition fees, room and board, school uniforms, school shoes, athletic wear, stationery, toiletries, bedding, school bag, scientific instruments and a travel allowance funding the student’s cost of travelling from home to school and return by public transport at the beginning and end of each school term.

Informal group of Anglican-Roman Catholic theologians discusses “new layers of unity”
1 May 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2919

Cardinal Désiré Joseph Mercier presided over the original Malines Conversation Group in the early 1920s. Photo Credit: Bibliothèque nationale de FranceAn informal but officially-sanctioned ecumenical dialogue between Anglican and Roman Catholic theologians has met to consider “the difficult question of Anglican Orders.” The Malines Conversation Group was originally established in the early 1920s by Cardinal Désiré-Joseph Mercier, the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Malines-Brussels; some 24 years after Pope Leo XIII declared that Anglican Orders were “absolutely null and utterly void”. The 1920s Malines Conversations Group envisioned the restoration of communion between Anglicans and Roman Catholics in the phrase l’Église Anglicane unie non absorbée – united, but not absorbed.

Anglican and Roman Catholic leaders in Ireland herald 20th anniversary of Belfast Agreement
9 April 2018 • Permanent link: iarccum.org/?p=2925

The Roman Catholic and Anglican Primates of Ireland and Archbishops of Armagh: Archbishops Eamon Martin (left) and Richard Clarke (right)The leaders of the Roman Catholic and Anglican Churches in Ireland have issued a joint statement celebrating “all that has been achieved in building peace” since the historic Belfast Agreement was signed 20 years ago. In a joint statement on eve of the 20th anniversary of the agreement, which is also known as the Good Friday Agreement, as it was agreed by political parties on 10 April 1998 – Good Friday – Archbishops Richard Clarke and Eamon Martin, say that the agreement “has continuing potential to transform society and life for all of us. Nothing remotely its equal has been outlined then or since.”

Archbishop Richard is the Anglican Archbishop of Armagh and Primates of the Church of Ireland; Archbishop Martin is the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Armagh and leader of the Catholic Church in the country. They say that the Good Friday Agreement “sought to address contentious political problems in the context of decades of violence, divided communities and immense suffering and death on our streets. As such it was a complex and, in places, controversial document.