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• St Chad ‘returns’ to Lichfield Cathedral (7 Nov 2022)

• Pope Francis prays for unity of church as he celebrates anniversary of Vatican II (11 Oct 2022)

• Irish Benedictine to lead Vatican’s relations with Anglicans and Methodists (7 Oct 2022)

• ‘Ecumenical winter’ must end, declares Archbishop Welby (8 Sep 2022)

• Archbishop of Canterbury: “In this time of world crisis, Christians are to be a community of peace” (7 Sep 2022)

December ~ 2019 ~ Anglican-Roman Catholic news & opinion

A Joint Christmas 2019 Message from Archbishops Richard Clarke and Eamon Martin
19 December 2019 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=3562
Irish Archbishops Richard Clarke and Eamon Martin. Photo: Church of Ireland

Together we wish you God’s richest blessings this Christmas and through the year ahead.

These few days at the turn of the year offer an opportunity for people who are normally very busy to give worthwhile time to family and friends. It can also be a stressful and difficult time for people who feel estranged from friends and loved ones to whom they were once close, and for those who feel they have no–one they can truly call a friend.

Over Christmas and New Year many people are able to rekindle relationships that have somehow gone sour. We are all capable of bringing light and love into another person’s life – perhaps someone for whom hope itself is fading, someone who desperately needs the rekindling of trust that only care and friendship can bring. Jesus Christ came into the world to bring us not only the light of his love but also the warmth of his friendship. Indeed, he assured his disciples that they were more than just “followers”; they were his “friends” (John 15.15).

Dialogue continues on path of co-operation
1 December 2019 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=3566
Bishop Brian Dunn, Catholic co-chair of the Anglican-Roman Catholic Dialogue in Canada

Catholics and Anglicans in Canada have been working on their relationship ever since Gen. James Wolfe surprised Gen. Louis-Joseph, Marquis de Montcalm on the Plains of Abraham in the fall of 1759.

By 1763 King Louis XV had no choice but to cede France’s North American possessions entirely to England’s King George III. The practicalities of a Protestant king and his Protestant army trying to impose their religion on a majority Catholic population were such that the English made allowances for the Catholic Church while they granted land and paid clergy salaries for the Anglicans.

More than 250 years later, the dialogue between Catholics and Anglicans in Canada carries on, unhindered by royalty and without much reference to the Seven Years’ War. The latest round ended Nov. 18 in Toronto after three days with a presentation to theology students at Trinity College of the Toronto School of Theology at the University of Toronto.