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• Joint statement on the canonization of John Henry Newman (10 Oct 2019)

• Cardinal John Henry Newman might well be the patron saint of ecumenism (8 Oct 2019)

• ARCIC Theologian, Fr Paul Béré, wins the Ratzinger Prize in Theology, 2019 (1 Oct 2019)

• New Director of Unity, Faith and Order appointed for the Anglican Communion (3 Sep 2019)

• Anglican Church of Canada elects its first female primate – Bishop Linda Nicholls (15 Jul 2019)

2017 ~ Anglican-Roman Catholic news & opinion

Incompatible ecumenism? Dialogues on communion, ordination, and primacy
23 January 2017 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2462
Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, met with IARCCUM at the offices of the PCPCU on October 6, 2016 immediately after his visit with Pope Francis. Photo: ACO

The same year that the International Anglican–Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission produced Growing Together in Unity and Mission (hereafter, GTUM), the International Commission for Anglican–Orthodox Theological Dialogue published the Cyprus Agreed Statement, The Church of the Triune God (hereafter, CTG). This statement represents the fruits of the third phase of a dialogue between Anglicans and Orthodox that began in 1973, and its particular task was “to consider the doctrine of the Church in the light of the doctrine of the Trinity, and to examine the doctrine of the ordained ministry of the Church” (Introduction).

This is a rich document, well worth careful study. Since I have spent some time thinking recently about Anglican and Roman Catholic ecclesiology in Rome with my Covenant brethren, including a consideration of GTUM, I want to identify a few places in CTG that helpfully reinforce and expand much of what we find in GTUM, as well as a few places that are possibly in tension with GTUM when held up for comparison.

Feeding God together: An ecumenism of mercy
18 January 2017 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2460
Photo: Flickr/Mark O'Rourke

Our parish, St. Matthew’s Anglican Church, sits on a major street at the edge of the great city of Toronto, with over 2.5 million residents. Less than a kilometer away sits Our Lady of Peace Roman Catholic Church. For years now, both parishes join together every Sunday night from November through Easter in a program called “Out of the Cold,” hosting homeless folks who flock from all over the city for a feast. After supper, many of the men choose to stay overnight and keep warm, sleeping on mats on the gym floor. Many sit and chat, or watch the nightly movie; others take the time to shower, and pick out warm clothes. The last time I volunteered, I talked with a Roman Catholic lady struggling with her faith and the stance of her church. We talked about how much we have in common in doctrine and in practice, and how little we worship together and serve together. She was someone without much of a theological background, and so it was difficult to explain to her why Anglican orders are not received as valid, or how our Communion has drifted further from Rome doctrinally over the years. For her, these esoteric beliefs — doctrines — were getting in the way of real fellowship.

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