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• The Lambeth Conference reschedules to 2022 (6 Jul 2020)

• Cardinal Nichols and Archbishop Welby pray together on first day of church opening (16 Jun 2020)

• Abbey opens its doors and welcomes two Archbishops (15 Jun 2020)

• Archbishop Justin Welby and Cardinal Vincent Nichols’ Joint Statement on West Bank Annexation (12 Jun 2020)

• Growing mutual trust: The path of relations with Anglicans and Methodists (10 Jun 2020)

Stories of resources from the Anglican-Roman Catholic dialogues

Ecumenical Vespers with Pope Francis and Archbishop Justin Welby at San Gregorio al Celio
5 October 2016 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2479

Pope Francis presides at the celebration of Vespers with the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the meeting between Paul VI and Archbishop Michael Ramsey, and the institution of the Anglican Center in Rome.

Anglicans, Roman Catholics team up to tackle big questions
20 May 2016 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=1772
Bishop Donald Bolen of the Roman Catholic diocese of Saskatoon

Is doubt just the opposite of faith? Or is it more complicated?

Bishop Donald Bolen, of the Roman Catholic diocese of Saskatoon, says this is one of the central issues facing people today, and a question that’s been on his mind throughout his life as a priest.

For him, it’s definitely more complicated.

“In a sense, apathy is the opposite of faith, whereas a lively doubt is a part of our faith,” Bolen says. “Doubt wants faith to have its reasons… I think when people pay serious attention to their doubts and don’t give up on them, but work with them, the doubting becomes a motivation to think more, to search more, to pray more, to look harder, to find reasons, and I think that’s a motivation which leads to a deeper faith,” he says.

“The doubter is on a quest.”

Rebuild my house: Sermon to the General Synod of the Church of England by Father Raniero Cantalamessa
25 November 2015 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=1709
Father Raniero Cantalamessa delivers his sermon in Westminster Abbey during a Eucharist to mark the inauguration of the 10th five-year-term of the Church of England's General Synod. Photo Credit: Picture Partnership/Westminster Abbey

Few prophetic oracles in the Old Testament can be dated so precisely as that of Haggai, which we have just heard in the first reading. We can place it between August and December in the year 520 BC. The exiles, after the deportation to Babylon, have come back to rebuild the Temple in Jerusalem. They set to work, but soon grow discouraged, each preferring to work on his own house instead. Into this situation comes the prophet Haggai, sent by God with the message we have heard.

The Word of God, once it is proclaimed, remains forever alive; it transcends situations and centuries, each time casting new light. The situation deplored by the prophet is renewed in history each time we are so absorbed in the problems and interests of our own parish, diocese, community – and even of our particular Christian denomination – that we lose sight of the one house of God, which is the Church.

The prophecy of Haggai begins with a reproof, but ends, as we heard, with an exhortation and a grandiose promise: “Go up into the hills, fetch timber and rebuild the House, and I shall take pleasure in it and manifest my glory there” – says the Lord”.

One circumstance makes this point particularly relevant. The Christian world is preparing to celebrate the fifth centenary of the Protestant Reformation. It is vital for the whole Church that this opportunity is not wasted by people remaining prisoners of the past, trying to establish each other’s rights and wrongs. Rather, let us take a qualitative leap forward, like what happens when the sluice gates of a river or a canal enable ships to continue to navigate at a higher water level.