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• The Lambeth Conference reschedules to 2022 (6 Jul 2020)

• Cardinal Nichols and Archbishop Welby pray together on first day of church opening (16 Jun 2020)

• Abbey opens its doors and welcomes two Archbishops (15 Jun 2020)

• Archbishop Justin Welby and Cardinal Vincent Nichols’ Joint Statement on West Bank Annexation (12 Jun 2020)

• Growing mutual trust: The path of relations with Anglicans and Methodists (10 Jun 2020)

Stories of arcic from the Anglican-Roman Catholic dialogues

Online meeting of ARCIC III
29 May 2020 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=3626
Instead of their annual in-person meeting, members of ARCIC-III met online over four days from May 12-15, 2020

Despite the challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, like other dialogues, is finding new ways to continue its work. Its plenary session scheduled to meet in Northern Italy this May was transferred into an online meeting over four days (12-15 May). Commission members were able to exchange texts using email and discuss them via an online platform. The Commission is preparing for two further online meetings later in the year. Work for these meetings will be prepared by subgroups of the Commission also working through online meetings. In this way, it is hoped that ARCIC can maintain momentum in working towards an agreed statement on how, in communion, the local and universal church discerns right ethical teaching. A communiqué was issued at the conclusion of the meeting.

New document fosters Anglican-Roman Catholic dialogue
30 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2959
The north front of Westminster Abbey

The latest agreed statement by the third Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC III) was released July 2. “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal” indicates that Anglicans and Catholics are still on the way together and learning from each other. The year 1966 included a watershed moment for Anglican-Roman Catholic dialogue: Then-Archbishop of Canterbury Michael Ramsey paid a visit to Pope Paul VI, and a common journey began. In 1970, ARCIC was instituted and, since then, has explored the themes of authority and ecclesiology of communion.

Dalle differenze s’impara. Documento della commissione internazionale anglicano-cattolica
5 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2947
Welcoming Christ, a sculpture above the main north door of Liverpool Cathedral

La differenza non è più motivo di sospetto o di rimprovero, ma è soprattutto un’opportunità arricchente per l’ascolto reciproco, l’apprendimento e la conversione. È questo lo spirito innovativo che sottende il nuovo documento adottato dalla Commissione internazionale anglicana-cattolica. Si tratta della prima dichiarazione concordata della terza fase di dialogo ufficiale, nota anche come ARCIC III. Il documento, intitolato Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal (Camminare insieme sulla strada: imparare a essere la Chiesa – locale, regionale, universale) è stato concordato nel corso di una riunione svoltasi a Erfurt, in Germania, nel 2017, ma è stato diffuso il 2 luglio scorso dopo sette anni di riunioni e consultazioni congiunte.

Groundbreaking document released on how Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn from each other
4 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2939
Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission met in the central German city of Erfurt in May 2017 for their seventh meeting. During their meeting they completed the agreed statement on ecclesiology

An agreed statement produced by the official commission for dialogue between the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches has been heralded as “ground-breaking” and an “important step on the pilgrimage towards fuller unity in Christ”. The text for the work – “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal” – was agreed at a meeting of the third phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC III) in the German city of Erfurt in May 2017. It was the first document produced by ARCIC III and is the culmination of seven years’ work.

ARCIC III: Anglicans and Roman Catholics can learn much from each other, says new agreed statement
4 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2950
The choir of Hereford Cathedral was invited to join the choir of the Sistine Chapel on the steps of St Peter's, Rome, to sing for the two-hour St Peter's mass on 29 June 2018. The Dean of Hereford Cathedral, the Very Revd Michael Tavinor said: 'We felt today that we were playing our small part for the cause of Christian unity. Those choirboys will be telling their grandchildren about the day they came to Rome and sang for the Pope. It will always be with them'

After nearly seven years of deliberation, the third Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC III) has issued a statement on authority, structure, and decision-making, which sets out how the two traditions might learn from each other. The 34,000-word statement Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be the Church — local, regional, universal, which runs to 70 pages, was published on Monday on the website of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity. The text was agreed in Erfurt, Germany, the scene of Martin Luther’s early ministry, on the 500th anniversary of the start of the Reformation on the Continent. ARCIC members have described the agreed statement as “exciting”, and suggest that it has the potential to restore ecumenical dialogue to good health after the difficulties experienced since Anglican developments such as the ordination of women and openly gay clergy, and the blessings of same-sex unions.

ARCIC document hailed as ‘groundbreaking’ by Catholics and Anglicans
4 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2943
In this 2017 file photo, Pope Francis is flanked by Archbishop David Moxon, then the archbishop of Canterbury's representative to the Vatican, and Cardinal Kurt Koch, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, as they arrive for an ecumenical prayer service to conclude the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity at the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls in Rome

Members of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission expressed excitement about a fresh approach to ecumenism outlined in a statement that has taken seven years to produce. Paula Gooder, a British theologian and an Anglican member of the commission, known as ARCIC III, described the statement reflecting on authority and ecclesial communion as “groundbreaking.” “We feel that … we are walking together more closely than ever,” Gooder told Catholic News Service in a July 2 telephone interview. “I think this is a really important document.” She described the commission’s work as entering “new territory” and that she sees “great potential for future conversations and that is really exciting.” Archbishop Bernard Longley of Birmingham, England, Catholic co-chair of ARCIC, said he felt the document was “exciting” because it restored ecumenical dialogue after a hiatus caused by the changes within the Anglican Communion, such as the priestly and episcopal ordination of women.

Agreed statement on ecclesiology: Walking Together on the Way
3 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2935
Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission met in the central German city of Erfurt in May 2017 for their seventh meeting. During their meeting they completed the agreed statement on ecclesiology

The Third Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC III) has issued its first agreed statement with the title Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal. Since its first meeting in 1970, ARCIC has published thirteen agreed statements. The third phase of the dialogue began in 2011 with the dual mandate to explore “the Church as Communion, local and universal, and how in communion the local and universal Church come to discern right ethical teaching.” The current document completes the first part of this mandate.

Catholics, Anglicans complete work on structures of authority, communion
3 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2945
Pope Francis greets Anglican Archbishop Bernard Ntahoturi, director of the Anglican Centre in Rome and the archbishop of Canterbury's personal representative to the Holy See, during his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Nov. 8, 2017

The Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission published its first document in 13 years on how both institutions can learn from each other in the exercise of ecclesial authority locally, regionally and globally. The document, “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal,” is the first to come out of the third phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, known as ARCIC III, which began meeting in 2011. The Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity made the document public on its website July 2. The latest agreed statement on how structures of authority support and promote ecclesial communion is considered a key element in understanding how discussion and debates are handled and decisions about ethics and “right” moral teachings are made, which will be the topic of the next document by ARCIC III.

New ARCIC text charts a way forward
3 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2941
Archbishop of Birmingham Bernard Longley, the Catholic co-chair of ARCIC-III, is pictured here at a service of Vespers

Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal” is the first document produced by ARCIC in 13 years. Catholics can learn from Anglicans in giving a greater role to the laity in matters of church governance and more authority to local bishops’ conferences, according to a landmark new document from the official dialogue body of the two Churches. Anglicans, the text also argues, should focus on setting up structures and processes that safeguard the worldwide identity of its Communion and avoid becoming too focussed on one province. The recommendations are contained in “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church – Local, Regional, Universal”, the first document produced by the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) in 13 years.

Humble companions: Catholic-Anglican document sees healing in difference
3 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2933
Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission met in the central German city of Erfurt in May 2017 for their seventh meeting. During their meeting they completed the agreed statement on ecclesiology

A new document driven by a fresh approach taken by the official Anglican-Roman Catholic dialogue commission reflects a major development in ecumenism where difference is not cause for suspicion or reproach, but is used as an enriching opportunity for mutual listening, learning and conversion.

This notable change is seen in the first agreed statement from the newest and third phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, known as ARCIC III. The statement, “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church — Local, Regional, Universal,” was released to the public July 2 after seven years of joint meetings and consultations.

Catholic-Anglican dialogue document suggests both churches can learn from other
2 July 2018 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2930
Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission met in the central German city of Erfurt in May 2017 for their seventh meeting. During their meeting they completed the agreed statement on ecclesiology

The official commission for dialogue between the Roman Catholic and Anglican churches has published its first document in 13 years, focusing on how each global institution can learn from the other in balancing exercise of ecclesial authority at the local, regional and worldwide levels.

Among the considerations in the 68-page report, released July 2, are questions of how the Catholic Church might learn from the Anglican experience to empower local church leaders to act more independently from Rome at times, and to give more governing authority to consultative bodies such as the Synod of Bishops.

“The Roman Catholic Church can learn from the culture of open and frank debate that exists at all levels of the Anglican Communion,” the members of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission state in one of the conclusions of their document, titled: “Walking Together on the Way: Learning to Be the Church — Local, Regional, Universal.”

Anglicans, Catholics in Erfurt: ‘Walking together on the way’
30 May 2017 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2590
Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission met in the central German city of Erfurt in May 2017 for their seventh meeting. During their meeting they completed the agreed statement on ecclesiology

‘Walking together on the way’ is the title of a new document to be published by the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, whose members met this month in Erfurt, Germany. Despite some “difficult conversations” and “hard questions” over the past year, the Anglican and Catholic theologians who make up ARCIC III managed, at the May 14th to 20th meeting, to conclude the first part of their mandate, finding agreement on ways in which the two Churches are structured at local, regional and universal levels. The new statement opens the way for the Commission to tackle the second part of its mandate on how the Churches, at local and universal level, are able “to discern right ethical teaching”. But what does the new ecumenical text contain? And how will it affect ordinary Catholics and Anglicans in the pews? To find answers to those questions, Philippa Hitchen spoke to the Catholic co-secretary of ARCIC III, Fr Anthony Currer of the Pontifical Council for Christian Unity.

Anglicans and Roman Catholics agree statement on ecclesiology
30 May 2017 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2577
Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission met in the central German city of Erfurt in May 2017 for their seventh meeting. During their meeting they completed the agreed statement on ecclesiology

Anglicans and Roman Catholics should see in each other “a community in which the Holy Spirit is alive and active,” the latest communiqué from the official ecumenical dialogue between the Anglican Communion and the Roman Catholic Church says. Members of the third-phase of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) met in the central German city of Erfurt early this month for their seventh meeting. They chose to meet in the city to mark the 500th anniversary of the Reformation – it is here that Martin Luther was ordained and lived as a monk. During their meeting, the members of ARCIC agreed the text of a new statement looking at Anglican and Roman Catholic ecclesiology. Walking Together on the Way: Learning to be Church – Local, Regional, Universal, to be known as The Erfurt Document, will be published next year.

Roman Catholic relations with the Anglican Communion in 2016
25 January 2017 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2449

When his Grace, Archbishop Justin Welby, visited Rome in June 2014, Pope Francis, in his address to the Archbishop said, quite simply, “We must walk together.” The image of the journey undertaken together was already a theme common to a number of papal speeches, and part of Pope Francis’s vision of the Church. Addressing clergy and lay-people in Assisi on 4 October 2013, he said, “I think this is truly the most wonderful experience we can have: to belong to a people walking, journeying through history together with our Lord, who walks among us! We are not alone; we do not walk alone. We are part of the one flock of Christ that walks together.” This conception of the Church has much to offer our ecumenical relationships. The image has now been used in a variety of different contexts and has been enthusiastically taken up by other Christian leaders. However, two moments in Anglican-Catholic relations that occurred in 2016 have given a fuller sense to its meaning and enable us to discern with greater clarity what walking together with our ecumenical partners might mean.

These two moments came at the beginning and the end of a vespers service celebrated by Pope Francis and Archbishop Justin Welby at San Gregorio al Celio on 5th October. The vespers celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the historic meeting between Blessed Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Michael Ramsey in 1966. On that occasion the first Common Declaration between a Pope and the Archbishop of Canterbury was published. It signalled the desire of both communities to work towards a “unity of truth”.

Walking the talk: Catholics, Anglicans work together as they seek unity
6 October 2016 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=2076
Pope Francis gave Archbishop Justin Welby a replica of the Crozier of St. Gregory the Great

If Christians are called to live their faith concretely, then they cannot leave out concrete signs of the unity to which Jesus calls them. And just because the formal Anglican-Roman Catholic theological dialogue has been forced to grapple with new church-dividing attitudes toward issues such as the ordination of women and the blessing of same-sex marriages, it does not mean that common prayer led by Anglican and Catholic leaders and concrete collaboration by Catholic and Anglican parishes are simply window dressing.

Dozens of Catholic and Anglican bishops and several hundred priests and laity from both communities gathered in Rome in early October to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Vatican meeting of Blessed Paul VI and Anglican Archbishop Michael Ramsey of Canterbury, almost 50 years of formal theological dialogue through the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (known as ARCIC) and the 50th anniversary of the Anglican Centre in Rome.

The celebrations, highlighted by an ecumenical evening prayer service Oct. 5 with Pope Francis and Anglican Archbishop Justin Welby of Canterbury, coincided with a meeting of a newer body, the International Anglican-Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission, known as IARCCUM.

ARCIC & IARCCUM: 50 years of walking together in faith
24 August 2016 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=1852

ARCIC & IARCCUM: 50 years of walking together in faith’ is a symposium to be held Wednesday, 5 October 2016 at the Pontifical Gregorian University. Planned in conjunction with the IARCCUM pilgrimage, this symposium will be an opportunity to explore in detail some of the achievements of 50 years of dialogue between Anglicans and Roman Catholics.

Anglicans, Catholics to publish first ARCIC III volume
17 May 2016 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=3021
The Labyrinth at Anglican convent of St John the Divine in Toronto, Canada, where the 2016 ARCIC meeting is taking place, symbolises a pilgrimage of penitence and prayer

Anglican and Catholic theologians, meeting in Toronto, Canada this week, have agreed on the publication of their first ARCIC III document on the theme “Towards a Church fully reconciled”. The volume, which is likely to be published in the autumn, uses the ‘Receptive Ecumenism’ approach to look at the limitations within each communion and see how one Church can help the other grow towards the fullness of faith. The third Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC III) is holding its sixth annual meeting from May 11th to 19th, hosted by the Anglican sisters of St John the Divine in Toronto. The 18 members of the Commission have completed work on the first part of their mandate, exploring tensions between the local and Universal Church within the two communions, and are continuing discussions on a second volume, looking at how Anglicans and Catholics make difficult moral and ethical decisions.

Anglican-Catholic dialogue hammering out the ‘tough difficulties’
16 May 2016 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=1769
English Archbishop Bernard Longley, co-chair of ARCIC III at the 2016 meeting in Toronto

After nearly 50 years of discourse between the Catholic and Anglican communions, the official dialogue body wants to fine-tune how it studies the differences and similarities between two churches which both call themselves Catholic.

ARCIC III hasn’t proved itself yet,” Sir David Moxon, Anglican co-chair of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, told The Catholic Register following an ecumenical evensong on Pentecost Sunday.

This third stage of the dialogue has been meeting since 2011, but has yet to publish a major document. It is currently studying how the Church arrives at moral teaching.

The official dialogue sponsored by the Vatican and the Archbishop of Canterbury is meeting in Toronto until May 18, when a concluding communique is expected from the meeting of 22 bishops, theologians and support staff. It is the first time the body has met in Canada and, to the knowledge of the participants, the first time in 50 years that ARCIC has met during Pentecost, when the Holy Spirit first revealed the global unity of the Christian message expressed in the diversity of languages from around the world.

Anglican-Catholic dialogue coming to Toronto
29 April 2016 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=1763
Saskatoon Roman Catholic Bishop Donald Bolen, left, and Anglican Bishop Linda Nicholls, co-chairs of the Canadian Anglican-Catholic Dialogue in a file photo taken at Queen of the Apostles Retreat Centre in Mississauga

One of the most important and troubled projects from the Second Vatican Council arrives in Toronto May 11 for some serious, scholarly, and saintly talk.

The Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, better known as ARCIC, rolls into town to puzzle over how Catholics and Anglicans make decisions over ethical questions and to find new ways to sum up its work over the last five decades.

ARCIC is the official ecumenical dialogue between the world’s 85 million Anglicans and 1.3 billion Catholics set up by the Vatican and the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1969.

This is the first time ARCIC has met in Canada, and it gives Canada’s own Anglican-Catholic dialogue partners a chance to rub shoulders with their international counterparts.

Pope Francis meets members of ARCIC III
30 April 2015 • Persistent link: iarccum.org/?p=1597
Pope Francis met with members of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission

This morning Pope Francis received in audience twenty members of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission, meeting in these days in order to study the relationship between the universal Church and the local Church, with particular reference to processes for discussions and decision making regarding moral and ethical questions. The Commission was created as a result of the historic meeting in 1966 between Pope Paul VI and the Archbishop of Canterbury, Arthur Michael Ramsey, who signed a joint declaration to establish dialogue based on the Gospel and the common tradition in the hope of leading to the unity in truth for which Christ prayed.

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